6 Incredible Charities That Support Women’s Financial Independence

At HerMoney, we think female financial independence is something to be celebrated every day, but during the month of March, it’s an especially good time to pause and pay tribute to all the amazing women who came before us, and celebrate a new generation of game-changers who are busy building their empires. In honor of this year’s Women’s History Month, International Women’s Day — or, let’s be real — any time you want, consider donating or getting involved with charities that help elevate our fellow women. Here’s a look at six incredible charities that are giving women a helping hand on their rise to the top, supporting their financial independence, helping them build confidence and empowering change.

Savvy Ladies

Sure, some of us were lucky enough to grow up with two parents who taught us the in’s-and-outs of investing and saving, but many women weren’t as fortunate. This non-profit’s main purpose is to bring financial planning education to those who need it.

What They Do: Through a variety of programs that include seminars, webinars, workshops, helplines and newsletters, they offer free money advice. Their free advice helpline is especially popular for women looking for a better understanding of a particular tax law, or seeking reassurance when the market ebbs and flows. The organization hosts in-person seminars in New York City, but webinars can be viewed from anywhere.

How to Get Involved: Savvy Ladies always need experts to volunteer their time and offer their wisdom. Monetary donations are welcome, too.

Invest in Girls

Considering that just 18 percent of finance jobs are held by women, there’s huge room for growth in this industry. And it’s something that this non-profit is passionate about changing. They aim to educate a new generation of financially-literate girls and inspire them to join the workforce and bridge the gender gap in STEM fields.

What They Do: Volunteers from this non-profit work at schools around the country to teach young women everything from personal finance skills to what a career at a bank might look like. Most of the girls involved in the program will be awarded a summer internship in the financial services sector, providing hands-on training.

How to Get Involved: There are many ways to team up with Invest in Girls, including hosting a fundraiser, hosting a workplace industry trip if you happen to work in finance, or donating dollars.

READ MORE: 5 Female Entrepreneurs On Their Greatest Financial Lessons

Women Employed

For most women, career paths are less like a straight arrow to the sky, and more like a strenuous hike with peaks and valleys. This non-profit seeks to improve women’s economic status and remove barriers to economic equity. They’ve been fighting unjust laws, challenging policy and protecting women through pregnancy discrimination and sexual harrassment in the workforce since 1973.

What They Do: Women Employed offers services for working women who may be facing a challenging work situation, and helps them team up with local communities and governments to promote change. They also lend their expertise to politicians who are affecting change, and encourage people to vote.

How to Get Involved: The organization has local chapters throughout the country where you can get involved in myriad ways. You can donate cash, attend an event or a luncheon, or volunteer your time to organize gatherings and join their action network, to name a few.

Girlboss Foundation

The name says it all: This non-profit is creating a new league of ‘girlbosses’ by directly investing in their mission. Since 2017, this foundation has given more than $130,000 in financial grants to female entrepreneurs.

What They Do: Women with big ideas are encouraged to apply for a grant via the Girlboss website. Winners are selected on a bi-annual basis, and each one receives $15,000 to start her business. As a bonus, winners are also given networking and press opportunities to help them take things to the next level.

How to Get Involved: If you’ve got a great idea, apply! Otherwise, you can donate cash to directly benefit recipients.

Akola Project

In Uganda, the average person takes home a salary of less than $1.90 a day — and for women, that figure is even lower. This non-profit provides career opportunities for women, mostly those living in rural communities along the Nile River. The women make jewelry and accessories for the Akola project (there now have 200 employees and counting) and these women not only receive living wages, they also participate in a financial literacy program that enables them to elevate themselves and their families out of poverty.

What They Do: Women who work for Akola earn more than double what they would typically in their region. This huge uptick in funds can help them embrace opportunities that would not otherwise be available to them.

How to Get Involved:  Buy Akola products! If you can’t find something that’s your cup of tea, consider it the next time you have a gift to give.

Ladies Who Launch

Forget ‘lunching,” this non-profit wants women to bring a lot more to the table than just iced tea and finger sandwiches. Their main mission is to support, celebrate and educate female entrepreneurs throughout the world.

How They Do It: They host various events — from meet-ups to dinners and galas — that bring women together to raise funds for causes and companies they believe in. The organization offers hands-on training for things like business plan creation and development, and how to raise capital. Their website also offers free downloadable documents and contracts, and other entrepreneurial tools, including how-to videos.

How to Get Involved: In addition to joining the network and signing up for their newsletter, you can attend the events to see how you can help in your area.

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Lindsay Tigar

Lindsay Tigar is a lifestyle and travel writer based in Boston. Her work has appeared on National Geographic, Travel + Leisure, CNN and many other publications. You can find a collection of her writing at lindsaytigar.com.

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